US Nuke Regulator Keeps Getting Hacked

US Nuke Regulator Keeps Getting Hacked

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission was “successfully hacked” three times in recent years in assaults involving tainted e-mails, according to an internal investigation on cyber attacks at the bureau, Nextgov.com reported on Tuesday.

nuke regulator hack

US Nuke Facility that has been Hacked

At least two of the strikes originated abroad, according to the report obtained a rare public report by Nextgov, with details of a cyber assault on the energy sector.

Hackers May have Political Ties

The publication said it got a replica of a report by the NRC’s Office.

The report failed to identify the states where the attacks originated or say if data was stolen in the regulatory agency, which holds data that is sensitive on the nuclear power sector.

Reuters wasn’t immediately able to get the report.

nuclear workers breach

“The few efforts recorded in the OIG Cyber Crimes Unit report as getting some accessibility to NRC networks were discovered and proper measures were taken,” NRC spokesman David McIntyre said.

In among the three instances, 12 workers clicked on a link in a phishing e-mail that took them to what the bureau considered was a spreadsheet that was tainted, McIntyre said. In another instance, attackers endangered an NRC employee’s private e-mail account, subsequently sent 16 bureau workers malicious e-mails, McIntyre told Reuters.

The government seldom discloses cyber attacks involving organizations.

Officials say they keep information regarding cyber security secret to both prevent hackers from identifying means to start copycat strikes, and to encourage companies to share info with the government without fear of possibly adverse marketing.
While the attackers’ identities aren’t understood, or at least not reported, advice held on the systems of the NRC would be of clear interest to anyone seeking to check out vulnerabilities in the critical infrastructure, which would contain nation states in America.

US government agencies will not be required to disclose breaks, unless there’s evidence private information was exposed. Yet, according for their own investigations, was a 35 per cent increase in assaults on National bodies between 2013 and 2010.

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